WCAG

Does the ADA require 100% web accessibility?

Maybe. Part of the problem in answering this questions is that the Americans with Disabilities Act doesn’t mention (let alone define) web accessibility.

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Shifting Left: Design and UX Accessibility

Of course, the easiest and most cost-effective way to have a WCAG compliant website is to build it that way in the first place. And while it’s never too late, the absolute best time to start thinking about accessibility is when you are planning your site’s user experience (UX) and designs.

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You've Received an ADA Demand Letter. Now What?

Ideally, you can address accessibility gaps on your website or mobile app before you run into legal trouble. But if you have received a demand letter from a potential plaintiff, what should you do?

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The Bare Minimum for Web Accessibility

Everyone has to start somewhere. We are often asked where organizations should focus their initial efforts. This post is our attempt to sketch out a bare minimum; this isn’t enough but it should go a long way in improving your site’s user experience for all users while also reducing your risks of being sued under the ADA.

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DOJ's New Guidance on Web Accessibility and What It Means For Your Business

New federal guidance is a huge milestone for digital accessibility and an improvement over the previous uncertain status quo. That said, we were disappointed that the contents of the guidance document falls short of what we would have hoped for.

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